Course Catalog

Course Catalog

NUMBER COURSE TITLE
FI 203
FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS

Introduces financial analysis and management in terms of its most important functions: raising funds at minimum cost and risk and allocating those funds among competing short- and long-term uses. Topics include financial statement analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, financial markets and interest rate determination, stock and bond valuation models, capital budgeting methodologies and working capital management. Concepts of risk and return, cost of capital calculation and capital structure are introduced.

Prerequisite: ACCTG 201 (or ACCTG 1A) and MATH 20 (or MATH 30)., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 300
CORPORATE FINANCE

Presents an intermediate level treatment of corporate finance that builds on the conceptual and technical foundation of FI 203. Topics include risk and return models, cost of capital calculations, real options in capital budgeting, capital structure theory and practice, leasing, option valuation and the analysis of option-like securities, financial risk management and multinational finance.

Prerequisite: ACCTG 201 (or ACCTG 1A and ACCTG 1B), ECON 202 (or ECON 1 and ECON 2), FI 203 (or FI 100 or FI 300A) and MATH 40., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 300A
MANAGERIAL FINANCE

Introduces the principles of financial management at the level of the strategic business unit, in the departments and divisions of the firm. Students will focus on understanding capital budgeting and on planning and control decisions: how the firms funds are to be allocated across the universe of investment opportunities, and how the success of these efforts are to be monitored and evaluated. In addition, liquidity or cash management, a daily preoccupation of the financial manager will be explored. Students will learn the concepts, tools, and techniques necessary to making value-adding decisions in the SBU. In the process, the integration of finance with the other functional areas and strategic concerns of the firm will be emphasized. Case analysis and team projects are used as appropriate.

Prerequisite: ACCTG 201, MATH 240., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 305
FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS

Combines practical techniques of financial analysis with theoretical concepts underlying the presentation of financial statements. Students will improve their understanding of accounting as an information system that helps users make good business decisions. Topics include accounting principles; examination of the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows; application of the various quantitative techniques such as ratio analysis, equity valuation methods; credit evaluation and performance measurement. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 307
FINANCIAL MODELING

Presents the theory and practice of financial management with emphasizing computer-based modeling and forecasting. Uses spreadsheet and other software products to analyze the impact of financial decisions related to financial statement analysis, cash budgeting, cost of capital determination, capital budgeting and capital structure choices. The course covers a variety of techniques, such as sensitivity and scenario analysis, optimization methods, Monte Carlo simulation, regression and time-series analysis and neutral network models. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 308
MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEMS

Surveys systems for controlling and monitoring resource utilization within the context of the organizations objectives. Topics include performance measurement for responsibility centers, structuring of investment and profit centers, transfer pricing, control of managed costs, incentive systems, budgeting systems and long-range planning. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3

FI 312
CAPITAL BUDGETING AND LONG-TERM FINANCING

Analyzes capital budgeting and long-term financing decisions in depth. Topics include interaction of investment and financing decisions, project cash flow analysis, risk analysis, alternative valuation methods, capital structure theory and the selection of various financing methods. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 314
WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Examines financial decisions that affect the value of the firm in the short run. Topics include receivables management, inventory management, marketable securities management, short-term liability management and cash management. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014

FI 317
MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

Surveys the field of mergers and acquisitions using case studies. Topics include accounting for acquisitions, tax implications of mergers, legal aspects of mergers, the role of investment bankers in mergers, valuing business, merger negotiation, risk management, leveraged buyouts, tenders and defenses. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 318
VENTURE CAPITAL AND START-UP FINANCING

Examines the strategic and financial issues facing start-ups and venture capital investments. This course examines the entrepreneurial process, focusing on financing - how new ventures are funded, applying the perspective of both the venture seeking financing and investors considering how to identify and manage good opportunities. Topics covered include the history and current direction of the venture capital industry; alternative financing sources, notably venture capital and angel investors; business planning methods; screening new venture opportunities; valuation techniques; capital raising practices and methods; management of new ventures; and harvesting or exit strategies, including IPO's and mergers. Students will be able to attend investor forums, and guest lecturers will supplement the course content. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 320
FINANCIAL STRATEGY AND VALUE CREATION

Demonstrates the use of competitive strategy to create shareholder value, industry attractiveness, firm-based resources and competitive advantage in a variety of settings, including technology-intensive and mature industries. Introduces the use of transaction cost economics and the capital-asset pricing model to analyze vertical integration, diversification and global strategies. Extensively uses case studies to build strategy development skills. This course should not be taken by MBA students. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 340
INVESTMENTS

Presents the theory and practice of investment analysis. Topics include efficient market theory; risk and return analysis for stocks, bonds and cash equivalents; modern portfolio theory; asset pricing models; bond pricing and the term structure of interest rates; effects of taxes and inflation on investment choices; and derivative asset analysis. Prerequisite: FI 300.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 343
INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE FINANCE

Surveys the international aspects of financial management. Topics include the international currency arrangement for the settlement of private and public transactions; the theory of international financial adjustments; functions of financial institutions including the Federal Reserve System, the Euro-currency market, IBRD and IMF; financing of trade including EXIM and FCIA and commercial banks; foreign-exchange markets; management of currency exposure; estimating country debt-servicing capacity; and external debt-financing problems. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 344
FUNDAMENTAL ANALYSIS OF SECURITIES

Presents the concepts and theory underlying stock and bond analysis. Topics include understanding financial statements; income manipulations; common stock valuation techniques; industry analysis; company analysis; fixed income securities analysis; other investments such as convertibles, warrants, options and short-term fixed income securities; and efficient market theory. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 346
DERIVATIVE MARKETS

Introduces theory and practice in the forward, futures, swap and options markets. Topics include commodity derivatives, currency derivatives, stock options, stock index futures and options, interest rate derivatives, arbitrage strategies, Black-Scholes and Binomial option-pricing models and computer applications.

Prerequisite: FI 340., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014

FI 347
FINANCIAL ENGINEERING

Covers risk management techniques for corporations and managers of equity, bond and derivative portfolios. Topics include measurement of corporate risk exposure, portfolio risk exposure and value at risk for financial institutions; hedging the price risk of commodities, exchange rates, interest rates and equity markets; credit risk management; portfolio insurance; portfolio immunization; synthetic assets; and computer applications.

Prerequisite: FI 300; Corequisite FI 340 and FI 346., Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 350
PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Applies the theoretical principles of portfolio management to domestic and international asset allocation, the management of equity and fixed income portfolios and the use of derivatives to manage portfolio risk. Topics include passive and active management; quadratic optimization; international diversification; tactical asset allocation; market timing; factor models for risk measurement, optimization and performance attribution; hedging; and computer applications. Prerequisite: FI 340.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 352
TECHNICAL ANALYSIS OF SECURITIES

Examines empirical evidence concerning non-efficient markets in which technical analysis is thought to apply. Topics include trend analysis, turning-point analysis, charting techniques, volume and open interest indicators, contrary opinion theories and technical theories such as Dow theory and Elliott waves. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 354
WYCKOFF METHOD I

Studies the Richard D. Wyckoff method a complete, time-tested and effective approach to market analysis and trading. The action sequence is a unique active-learning way to acquire the skills and judgment needed to apply the Wyckoff method. Prerequisite: FI 352 or consent of department.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 355
WYCKOFF METHOD II

Continues the study of the Richard D. Wyckoff method, a complete, time-tested and effective approach to market analysis and trading. The action sequence is a unique active-learning way to acquire the skills and judgment needed to apply the Wyckoff method.

Prerequisite: FI 352 and FI 354, or consent of department., Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 358
TECHNICAL MARKET ANALYSIS STRATEGIES

Provides advanced studies in technical analysis and trading. Money management, investor psychology and technical analysis elements are considered. Focuses upon development of a trading plan. Prerequisite: FI 352 or consent of the department.

Units: 3

FI 360
BEHAVIORAL FINANCE

(Formerly FI 498P) Introduces the theories developed by research into cognitive biases, investor emotions and herd effects. Explores the applications of these theories in corporate finance and investment management and suggests approaches through which sophisticated investors can exploit the opportunities created by non-rational investors. Traditional (or standard) finance builds its theories on the presumption that assets are valued in modern financial markets through the buy-and-sell decisions of rational, profit-maximizing investors. An accumulating body of research challenges this fundamental presumption, suggesting instead that investment decisions are motivated by a complex array of non-rational psychological factors.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 382
BANK AND THRIFT MANAGEMENT I

Analyzes the management of the operations of banks, savings and loans, credit unions and other lending institutions. Topics include the banking industry, firm organizational structure, the legal and regulatory environment, performance analysis, services and financial statements, constraints on management decisions and marketing strategies. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014

FI 420
PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING

Introduces the broad scope of financial planning as it relates to personal goals/values, as well as its role in the financial services industry. Topics include careers in financial services, management of personal financial statements, time-value-of-money analysis, calculator/computer applications, insurance, social security, house-buying strategies, investments, retirement planning, income tax and estate planning. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 421
PERSONAL INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

Investigates the investment process from the perspective of the individual investor. Typically, such investors have small portfolios and must work with lower-quality information, greater time constraints, and less-sophisticated analytical skills than their institutional counterparts. This course will discuss approaches and techniques that enable individual investors to build and manage portfolios that offer returns commensurate with their risks. Familiarity with the universe of securities, the mechanics of trading, the many and varied sources of investment information, and with the vocabulary of investing will be emphasized. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A. This course is not open to students who have completed FI 340.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 422
RETIREMENT & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PLANNING

Covers strategies used by financial planners to help clients assess employee benefits and to reduce the tax burden while planning for retirement. Topics include retirement needs analysis; defined benefit and contribution plans; profit sharing; 401k; 403b; ESOP; IRA; SEP-IRA; Roth-IRA; Keogh; TSA; social security benefits and integration; vesting; employee benefits analysis; funding vehicles; plan installation and administration; asset balancing; buy-sell agreements, ERISA; stock redemption and cross-purchase plans; evaluation of retirement timing; life-cycle planning; retirement lifestyle issues; distribution planning; and post-retirement financial and qualitative assessment of needs. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination.

Corequisite: FI 420 (or FI 160) or FI 425 (or ACCTG 108A) or consent of department., Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 424
FACILITATING FINANCIAL HEALTH

Presents a new model to help clients achieve balanced and healthy financial lives. Integrated financial planning brings together the fields of psychotherapy, coaching and financial planning. It enables students to go beyond the traditional boundaries of financial planning to help clients build healthy relationships with money, to explore the roots of destructive financial behaviors, and to develop specific techniques to support constructive change.

Corequisite: FI 420, Units: 3

FI 425
INCOME TAX PLANNING

Strategies used by financial planners to help clients achieve greater tax efficiency. Topics include income tax concepts and calculations, income tax research methods, gross income realization, exclusions and deductions, passive activities, alternative minimum tax, tax considerations of business forms, taxable and non-taxable property transactions, compensation planning, family tax planning, audit risk and dealing with the IRS. Satisfies part of the requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: FI 420 or FI 160.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014

FI 426
ESTATE PLANNING

Introduces estate planning tools and strategies to assist a client in developing, maintaining and transferring his/her wealth consistent with objectives. Topics include professional role differentiation between financial advisers, CPAs, and estate-planning attorneys; writing disclaimers in a financial plan; gift and estate taxation; ownership of personal and real property issues; wills; letter of last instructions; trusts; trustees/personal representatives and their fiduciary responsibilities; probate strategies; implications for individuals; general/limited partnerships; closely held businesses; corporations; life insurance funding; post-mortem planning; creative estate planning strategies consistent with client goals and values; charitable giving strategies; California estate planning issues; and how to implement and monitor the estate plan. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: FI 420.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 428
BUSINESS VALUATION

Examines closely held companies, not publicly traded firms, for applications including mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures; raising capital and the venture capital model; capital structure and the cost of capital; performance planning and appraisal; real options pricing; and special industry analyses. A commonly stated objective for business managers is to add value to their companies or enterprises; this course covers the major topics for business valuations, analytical methods such as financial statement analysis; cash-flow and comparable company valuation methods; research techniques for obtaining information; and owners' interests. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 430
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT IN FINANCIAL SERVICES

Effective 3/20/12 Presents an overview of the different methods and skill sets needed to develop a financial services practice by developing and maintaining client relationships. Running an efficient practice will have a direct impact on the success of your marketing and business development efforts, as well as on the profitability and long-term value of your firm. This course exposes students to the various tools and methodologies used by best in-class practitioners. In addition, students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with some of the platforms currently used throughout the industry. Industry leaders and practitioners will join as guest speakers throughout the term. Topics include an overview of the current environment and the issues surrounding establishing a practice; a review of the personal tools needed in business development; the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of attracting new business; how to differentiate a business from other financial planners; how to develop trust with prospective clients; how to create a brand message; using the internet and other direct marketing tools; using the media and public relations; developing and implementing a budget and a plan; other marketing options including seminars, speeches, products, etc.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014

FI 434
CASES IN FINANCIAL PLANNING

Uses case studies that apply financial planning principles to strategic personal wealth management for advising clients in the comprehensive financial and estate-planning approach. Topics include: integrating and balancing client needs with financial products and strategies, update on taxation and new financial products, writing a comprehensive financial plan, presenting the plan, implementing the plan, providing periodic review, professional literature and resources, qualitative client factors and analysis, financial counseling techniques, and computer resources.

Prerequisite: FI 420 , FI 422, FI 426 and FI 483., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 450
PRACTICUM IN FINANCIAL PLANNING

A practicum is defined as a course, especially one in a specialized field of study, that is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Through this practicum, students will learn to work with clients in determining their needs and developing appropriate financial planning recommendations. It is designed to help them make the transition from the learning phase of their career to the actual practice of financial planning. At the heart of this process is an opportunity to work with experienced mentors as students develop a comprehensive financial plan for a real client. And while classroom time will include lectures, expert panels and guest speakers, significant time will also be devoted to role-playing exercises and critiques intended to prepare students for their client discovery and plan presentation meetings.

Prerequisite: FI 420, FI 421, FI 422, FI 425, FI 426, FI 483. Alternatively, completion of a course of study that qualifies the student to sit for the CFP Board's comprehensive exam, or passage of the CFP exam, with the consent of the program director., Units: 3

FI 460
REAL ESTATE

Analyzes real estate concepts and presents an overview of the industry. Topics include the nature of real estate assets as distinct from non-real-estate assets; the institutions, market forces and regulatory groups that affect real estate; the terminology and language used in connection with the conversion of land from non-urban to urban use; examination of activities and functions of those engaged in developing, building, appraising, financing, marketing, leasing and planning; and their interrelationships. This course fulfills part of the educational requirements of the California Department of Real Estate for salesperson and broker licensing, contact the DRE for more information. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 463
REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND INVESTMENT

Presents an analytical and applications approach to real estate finance and investment. Topics include real estate markets and institutions, real estate project analysis, conventional and creative financing, governmental and tax-related issues, real estate investment products, yield analysis and decision models. This course fulfills part of the educational requirements of the California Department of Real Estate (DRE) for salesperson and broker licensing. Contact the DRE for more information. Prerequisite: FI 203 (or FI 100) or FI 300A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014

FI 483
INSURANCE PLANNING

Explores personal risk analysis and insurance planning in the context of personal financial planning. Topics include career issues; contractual and agency legal issues; insurance distribution systems (including Internet); evaluating insurers; personal risk assessment; risk strategies; alternative risk transfer approaches; life insurance programming and product analysis; key-person insurance; business continuation applications; life insurance use in income & estate tax planning; applicability of other insurance products (e.g., health, disability, general liability, property and casualty); HMOs, group insurance plans; workers compensation; relevant aspects of social security; negligence issues; errors & omissions policies; & professional ethics. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination.

Corequisite: FI 420 (or FI 160) or consent of department., Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 497
INTERNSHIP: FINANCE

Offers students the opportunity to receive graduate-level work experience in a job directly related to their academic major and career goals. Students are responsible for your own placement in an internship approved by the department chair. A written internship proposal is required before consideration for this course. A written report is required upon completion of the internship.

Prerequisite: Consent of the department., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014

FI 498
SELECTED TOPICS IN FINANCE

Address significant, topical and practical problems, issues and theories in finance. Topics are compiled and selected by the department chair. This course may be taken more than once, provided the same topic is not repeated. Prerequisite: FI 300.Other prerequisites will vary based on topic.

Units: 1 - 3

FI 498BB
SEMINAR IN INVESTING: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN FUNDAMENTAL EQUITY RESEARC

This course is designed for students interested in in-depth analysis and stock picking using fundamental analysis. The course material will entail regular analysis of market conditions that present investment opportunities in the global stock market. Industries covered will be financials, insurance, technology, materials and consumer among others. Detailed analysis of annual reports, competitive dynamics, financial models, earnings calls, sell-side research will be examined. The instructor currently manages an equity fund and has been in the industry for the last 12 years. Pre-requisite: FI 344 or consent of the instructor.

Units: 3

FI 498EI
SEMINAR IN FUNDAMENTAL EQUITY INVESTING -A PRACTITIONER'S PERSPECTIVE

This advanced level seminar is ideally suited for professionals in the securities industry, for students who aspire to a career in the securities industry, and/or those who wish to understand and apply professional equity analysis techniques for successful long-term investing. In the past, several students of this class have secured analyst positions in leading buy-side and sell-side investment firms. The seminar will cover techniques to evaluate financial and strategic strengths of corporations through the real-life case-studies. The coursework will allow a hands-on look into finding and evaluating publicly traded companies for special situation investing. The coursework and case studies will reveal the time-tested money management techniques of successful investors. Prerequisite: FI 344, or FI 203 and the consent of the instructor.

Units: 3

FI 498ET
BUSINESS ETHICS AND CORPORATE STANDARDS

Explores how to succeed in the corporate environment and the broader financial markets by building one's "ethical muscle" through lively case discussions and classroom activities. Focuses on learning frameworks and experimenting with how to anticipate, identify, critically analyze and resolve ethical dilemmas that will ultimately arise throughout one's professional career as a leader, manager and direct report. Covers all topics necessary to prepare students for the business ethics segment of the CFA exam.

Units: 3

FI 498J
WYCKOFF METHOD AND THE ELLIOTT WAVE PRINCIPLE

Combines the best of two classical stock market analysis techniques: Each heralded as market wizards by Technical Analysis of Stocks and Commodities magazine, Mr. R.D. Wyckoff and Mr. R.N. Elliott have very different underlying philosophies and applications. Together they act as ideal cross-validation of each other when applied to concrete cases involving market timing. Prerequisite: FI 355 or the consent of the instructor.

Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 498R
ONLINE INVESTING: USING THE INTERNET FOR STOCK MARKET RESEARCH AND INVESTING

Provides an intensive study of the rich variety of sources on the internet that provide information to help the investor make appropriate stock selections, and the techniques of day trading on the internet. Prerequisite: FI 352

Units: 3

FI 498RM
VALUE ADDED RETIREMENT SAVINGS MANAGEMENT

Explores a provocative retirement savings management strategy known as 401(k) day trading. Contrary to the conventional buy-and-hold strategy, 401(k) day trading calls for daily fund transfers in retirement savings accounts where trades do not trigger immediate taxes or direct trading costs. Students will explore how technology, market conditions, and the impact of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) on the design of qualified defined contribution plans (including money purchase, 401(k), and other profit sharing plans), Keogh Plans, Simplified Employee Pensions (SEPs), and traditional (and Roth) individual retirement accounts (IRAs) have come together to enable investors to build lasting gains through 401(k) day trading.

Units: 3

FI 498S
BUILDING EFFICIENT TRADING SYSTEMS

Guides students through the construction of their own trading system. In the process, a number of technical methods will be examined in depth: charting, fractal and number driven. Guest speakers will include some prominent traders.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 498TS
QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR TECHNICAL TRADING SYSTEMS

Provides advanced studies into the building, optimization, validation, and monitoring of ongoing trading system stability using trading/charting software, Excel statistical calculations, and Monte Carlo simulations. Several types of trading and active investing systems based on technical analysis will be covered. Topics will include descriptive statistics, custom objective functions, walk forward optimization, risk management, position sizing, and portfolio analysis.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 498U
FACILITATING FINANCIAL HEALTH: TOOLS FOR FINANCIAL PLANNERS AND COACHES

Presents the latest research used in facilitating change in individuals to help students and their clients understand the roots of destructive financial behaviors, and describes specific techniques to help students and their clients make positive changes. Facilitating financial health in clients requires more than presenting spreadsheets and asset allocation models. It requires an understanding of the kind of life the client envisions and how the client's emotional and psychological predispositions facilitate or obstruct the realization of successful financial plans. Integrating the fields of psychotherapy, coaching and financial planning provides new skill sets for students, which allow them to go beyond the traditional boundaries of financial planning and to serve clients far more effectively in creating and maintaining financial health. Prerequisite: FI 420 or consent of department.

Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 498X
WYCOFF METHOD III

Focuses on advanced application of the Wyckoff method. In addition, students will learn position sizing and portfolio management strategies that will enhance performance. Prerequisite FI 354 and FI 355 or consent of department.

Units: 3

FI 499
DIRECTED STUDY IN FINANCE

Provides an opportunity for the advanced student with a specific project in mind to do reading in a focused area and to prepare a substantial paper under the direction of a faculty member. Only one directed study course may be taken for credit toward a masters degree.

Prerequisite: FI 300; consent of the instructor and the department., Units: 1 - 3

FI 100
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Introduces financial analysis and management in terms of its most important functions: raising funds at minimum cost and risk and allocating those funds among competing short- and long-term uses. Topics include financial statement analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, financial markets and interest rate determination, stock and bond valuation models, capital budgeting methodologies and working capital management. Concepts of risk and return, cost of capital calculation and capital structure are introduced.

Prerequisite: ACCTG 1A and MATH 20 or MATH 30., Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014 , Summer 2014 , Spring 2014

FI 101
STRATEGIC DECISIONS IN FINANCING AND INVESTING

Expands and completes the discussion of issues raised in Finance 100 and extends the examination of the field of finance to include such important areas as dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions. Case analysis is used extensively. Prerequisite: FI 100.

Units: 3

FI 102
FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Introduces tools for an applied approach to the analysis of financial problems. Topics include funds flows, ratio analysis, cash-flow budgets and projections, and financial and operating leverage models. Includes identification of sources of financial information. Prerequisite: FI 100.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 105
MODELING FOR FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Presents the techniques of financial analysis and modeling using electronic spreadsheet tools. Includes basic operations such as organizing spreadsheets, entering numbers and text, performing calculations, using financial commands, creating charts, embedding spreadsheets in word processing documents, file management, etc. It emphasizes advanced spreadsheet methods for doing sensitivity analysis, breakeven ratio analysis, capital budgeting, sales forecasting, funds forecasting, cash budgeting, cash flow and financial ratio analysis, and capital structure analysis. This is a hands-on course that develops spreadsheet skills and shows how to use the results to make better financial decisions. It highlights the use of spreadsheets for communicating as well as calculating. Prerequisite: FI 100.

Units: 3 , Offered: Fall 2014

FI 120
INVESTMENTS

Introduces the theory of portfolio analysis and the characteristics of various investment instruments with a focus on securities investment analysis, with some consideration of other investment forms. Topics include sources of investment information, risk/return analysis, money-market investments, measuring investment performance. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: FI 100.

Units: 3 , Offered: Summer 2014

FI 141
INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND FINANCE

Surveys operational aspects of international banking. Topics include financing international operations, sources of capital, the foreign-exchange market, transaction and translation risks, international financial institutions (including the Euro-currency market), international collections, lending policies, government regulations, services available to the global manager. Prerequisite: FI 100.

Units: 3

FI 160
PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING

Introduces the process of comprehensive personal financial and estate planning. Topics include historical context of personal financial planning and services, career opportunities, analysis of personal financial statements, time-value-of-money applications, consumer decision-making analysis, personal risk/insurance analysis, house-buying analysis, savings and investment strategies, income/retirement/ estate tax planning. Satisfies part of the educational requirements to sit for the CFP examination. Prerequisite: ACCTG 1A.

Units: 3 , Offered: Spring 2014

FI 197
INTERNSHIP: FINANCE

Offers students the opportunity to receive work experience in a job directly related to their academic major and career goals. Students will be responsible for their own placement in an internship approved by the department chair. A written internship proposal is required before consideration for this course. A written report is required upon completion of the internship. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

Units: 3

FI 198
SELECTED TOPICS IN FINANCE

Address significant, topical and practical problems, issues and theories in finance. Topics will be selected by the department chair. This course may be taken more than once, provided the same topic is not repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chair. Prerequisites will vary based on topic.

Units: 3

FI 199
DIRECTED STUDY IN FINANCE

Provides individual study of selected topics under supervision of a faculty member. Students are limited to one directed study course per trimester.

Prerequisite: Consent of the department., Units: 1 - 3