Profiles

Ingrid M. Turner

MBA 89

Prince George’s County (Md.) Councilwoman

Community Service Award

Given in recognition of outstanding leadership and service contributions to the community.

Prince George’s County (Md.) Councilwoman Ingrid M. Turner (MBA 89) already has a houseful of honors.

Her accolade-fest started with her career in the Navy, with medals for Achievement, Commendation and Meritorious Service. More recently, the Prince George’s Community Foundation bestowed its 2009 Civic Leadership Award on her, Emily’s Way handed over a Service Award in 2010 for Giving of Self for the Advancement of Others, and the Women Business Owners of Prince George’s County in 2011 gave her its Leadership by Example Award. In 2011 she was listed among the Washingtonian magazine’s 100 Most Powerful Women.

Yet, news that Golden Gate University was honoring her for community service brightened the sparkle in her eyes.

“It’s a wonderful feeling,” Turner said. “It’s like 25 years later, they followed me, they caught up with me and it’s as if I have made the university that provided my foundation proud of what I have accomplished. And that foundation, education, is one that opens doors and provides opportunities.”

The daughter of an Army officer and sister of three brothers who went to West Point, she was the wayward sheep who went to the Naval Academy. “I’m the only smart one,” she said, laughing. “I got all the good duty stations.”

Her first Naval duty station was Monterey, where she soon gravitated to GGU’s satellite for her MBA. Her next duty station allowed her to earn a Juris Doctorate from Catholic University, which led to her first duty station as a lawyer: Treasure Island.

“I was able to serve my country for 20 years on active duty,” Turner said. “When I came back to where I grew up, I wanted to put that knowledge to work helping my community. I believe youth are our future, so I have focused on education.” That said, it’s easy for Turner to single out two recent, profoundly satisfying accomplishments.

One: the opening this fall of a new, $56 million Greenbelt Middle School, replacing an appalling environment she described as “third world” after she took office in December 2006.

And: At last, a library in the Pointer Ridge section of Bowie, the town where she grew up and still lives.

“What’s my passion? Education, yes, but also, how can I give my community the tools to succeed?” she said. “My building blocks were like the ones I received from GGU — the tools I needed to succeed.”