Press Room: News Details



The Rewards From Effective Reform Could Be Great

GGU Law adds its voice to the call for IP reform. Professor William Gallagher, and 50 other IP scholars from around the nation, recently sent Congress a letter requesting statutory IP reform, citing the tremendous increase in patent litigation at the hands of Patent Assertion Entities (AKA Patent Trolls). Countering the claims of lobbyists, they write that the "evidence indicates that the net effect of patent litigation is to raise the cost of innovation and inhibit technological progress, subverting the very purpose of the patent system."

This 'n' That on a Tuesday Morning

Kit Yarrow, Professor Emerita, analyzes techniques used when "upselling" items to current customers in the food industry.

How Restaurants Get You to Spend More Money

Kit Yarrow, Professor Emerita, speaks with the Daily Herald to analyze the psychological affect item placement has on the average consumer.

Blocking Minimum Wage Increase, Boehner Relies on Lies

Dean Emeritus Terry Connelly dissects House Speaker John Boehner's actions toward a possible minimum wage increase.

Financial Advice Is Good, but Emotional Well-Being Is Better

Rick Kahler shares with time.com the emotional benefits of financial advising.

Equality Principles in Sub-Federal Immigration Laws

Professor Carrie Rosenbaum explores the effects of preemption of non-federal immigrant laws, like California's TRUST Act. Specifically, she contends that federal law does not preempt state TRUST Acts, which may lead non-federal organizations to regulate immigration law on their own accord. - Click the link above to read more, and to download Carrie Rosenbaum's full scholarly article published in the Chapman Law Review (2015)

Taxi Company Partners With Flywheel, Rebrand to a Bright Red Cars

Kit Yarrow, Professor Emeritus, provides her expert opinion on whether or not the Taxi Company should partner with Flywheel.

IOU 240 Euros, It's My Problem; IOU 240 Billion Euros, It's Your Problem!

Dean Emeritus Terry Connelly provides his expert advice on the buying and selling of stocks and bonds when considering international governments.

Best Online Bachelor's in Accounting: Students Before Profits Award 2014-2015

GGU's Bachelor of Science in Business with an Accounting Concentration makes the 2014-2015 list.

Maybe the Federal Reserve Has Been Right About the US Economy All Along

Dean Emeritus Terry Connelly reviews economic reports to make a conclusion about the Federal Reserve.

Governor Appoints Golden Gate University Professor to the California Board of Accountancy

Governor Appoints Golden Gate University Professor to the California Board of Accountancy

Dean Limelight: Rachel Van Cleave

"I've learned that we can't always have the answers, but with the right mindset and an excellent team, we can find some pretty good -- maybe even very good -- solutions," she said. That she has such a team in her faculty, staff and advisers, she said, enables her to see what are arguably troubled times for law schools including Golden Gate as a "transformative opportunity for legal education that can only benefit students." - Lawdragon Campus. Click the link above to read the full story.

Coalition Statement on EPA's Response to Address Aviation Lead Pollution

According to a press release issued by Friends of the Earth, Professor Deborah Behles, and an environmental protection cohort, filed a petition on behalf of the Friends of the Earth to address the level of lead in aviation fuel. Recently, "the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a response to a petition filed by environmental groups urging the agency to address lead emissions from aviation gasoline ---- the largest source of airborne lead emissions in the country. Lead has been banned from paints and automobile gasoline, but the toxic chemical still remains in the gasoline used by small, propeller-driven airplanes and other general aviation aircraft. Children are particularly susceptible to the harmful effects of lead, and research shows that children who live near general aviation airports have elevated blood lead levels. The EPA had previously set a deadline of mid- to late 2015 to issue its official determination that lead emissions from aviation gasoline could endanger public health and welfare. But In today's response, the EPA pushed that schedule back by three years, with a final determination not coming until 2018 ---- fifteen years after Friends of the Earth first called on the EPA to address this issue and decades after EPA first recognized the potential impact of lead in aviation fuel." To read the full article, please click the link above.

Why Won't People Guard Their Wealth?

Rick Kahler speaks with Time to share his financial expertise on protecting your wealth. His methods of protection include utilizing LLCs, trusts, and other entities.

Professor Laura Cisneros Elected Chair of the AALS Constitutional Law Section

GGU Professor Laura Cisneros has been elected by the Association of American Law Schools to chair the section on Constitutional Law. Founded in 1900, AALS also serves as the learned society for the more than 9,000 law faculty at its 178 member schools, and provides them with extensive professional development opportunities, including the AALS Annual Meeting which draws thousands of professors, deans and administrators. ... Click the link above to read more.

Ex Parte Requirements at the California Public Utility Commission: A Comparative Analysis and Recommended Changes

Professor Deborah Behles recommends changes for the CA Public Utility Commission.

Candlestick Park Will Go Out With a Wrecking Ball, Not a Bang

Professor Helen Kang Champions Environmental Rights in San Francisco

Labor Decision in Security Guard Case May Set New Precedence

"Employees required to stay at a worksite while on call should be compensated for all their hours, including sleep time, the California Supreme Court has ruled in a case involving a company based in Gardena. The state's highest court said Thursday that security guards who were obligated to stay in trailers on worksites in case they were needed were entitled to be paid for their time, even if they spent it watching TV, scouring the Internet or dozing... The greater the control a private employer exerted on on-call workers, the more likely that employer would be obligated to pay for all employees' hours, according to The Times. Golden Gate University law professor Hina B. Shah, who sided with employees in the case, representing nonprofit groups as friends of the court, told the newspaper that the ruling was a "a tremendous victory for California workers." "This decision will ensure that absent an explicit exemption, on-call workers in any industry are entitled to payment for all of their time," said Shah, adding that the ruling would particularly affect domestic workers who live in homes while attending to children or the elderly. Hospital and government workers would not be affected, she said. Jim Newman, general counsel for CPS Security Solutions Inc., the defendant in the case, agreed the impact would be "huge."

CNBC, The Lame Duck Network: Shilling For Short Sellers and Hating Obama Are Not Enough Anymore

Dean Emeritus, Terry Connelly, offers commentary on the true bias of CNBC.

Being an Optimist May be Good for Your Heart

Kit Yarrow, Professor Emerita, discusses the link between psychology and health according to extensive research and industry analysis.

Puppy vs. Puppy: Tail of Super Bowl Ads

Professor Emerita Kit Yarrow discusses the most popular Super Bowl ads and what factors contribute to their success.

Suit Against State Bar of California Spurs Calls for New Lawyer Discipline Model

The internal warfare at the nation's largest state bar is reviving criticism that its disciplinary system is weak and lets bad attorneys off the hook. Some say the episode shows a broken, dysfunctional institution that needs restructuring to properly police its more than 249,000 members. "The state bar for the last generation has been a completely dysfunctional organization," said Peter Keane, a former state bar vice president who teaches at Golden Gate University School of Law in San Francisco. "It seems to survive somehow, but... it gets worse with each iteration." To practice law, attorneys must be members of the bar, a public corporation created by the state legislature. The bar collects yearly dues that largely fund its operations. In November, Dunn -- an ex-Democratic lawmaker from Orange County -- was removed from his $259,000 executive director's post after four years. Within days, celebrity attorney Mark Geragos filed a lawsuit for Dunn alleging "glaring injustices, unethical conduct and massive cover-up that has crippled the State Bar's ability to function."

Striking at What it Means to be French

On Jan. 7 two gunmen slaughtered 12 people in the center of Paris. The horror would have been the same had they gunned down people at a tourist site or a supermarket, but by attacking the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, they shattered the essence of French identity. Merely hours after the attack, a scroll through Facebook yielded a sea of "Je Suis Charlie" profiles and announcements of protest rallies organized all across France. Collective national grief overwhelmed social media: We were all Charlie, and we were all wounded at our very core. To understand the depth of that reaction, one has to understand what Charlie Hebdo symbolizes.

On-call Workers Entitled to Pay for All Hours Spent at Job, Court Rules

Employees who while on call are required to stay at a worksite should be compensated for all their hours, including sleep time, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday. In a decision written by Justice Carol A. Corrigan, the state's highest court said security guards who were obligated to stay in trailers on worksites in case they were needed were entitled to be paid for their time, even if they spent it watching TV, scouring the Internet or dozing. Golden Gate University law professor Hina B. Shah, who sided with employees in the case, called the decision "a tremendous victory for California workers."

Has Technology Killed the Jewelry Industry?

The jewelry industry has experienced a steady decline in sales in recent years. Professor Emerita Kit Yarrow discusses the influence technology has on buying decisions via an article on Pacific Standard.